RunOnce for Linux

27 11 2011

On occasion, I’ve wished there was a Linux feature that enabled me to run any command once the next time the system comes up (sort of similar to Windows’ RunOnce). The last time I needed this, I put together a simple init script to provide the functionality. I use this on Debian, but it should work on any UNIX-y OS with Sys-V style init. Create a file called /etc/init.d/runonce with the following content. Don’t forget to make it executable (chmod a+x).

#! /bin/sh
### BEGIN INIT INFO
# Provides: runonce
# Required-Start:
# Required-Stop:
# Should-Start:
# Default-Start: S
# Default-Stop:
# Short-Description: RunOnce
# Description: Runs scripts in /usr/local/etc/runonce.d
### END INIT INFO

PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin
RUNONCE_D=/usr/local/etc/runonce.d

. /lib/init/vars.sh
. /lib/lsb/init-functions

do_start () {
 mkdir -p $RUNONCE_D/ran > /dev/null 2>&1
 for file in $RUNONCE_D/*
 do
 if [[ ! -f "$file" ]]
 then
 continue
 fi
 "$file"
 mv "$file" "$RUNONCE_D/ran/"
 logger -t runonce -p local3.info "$file"
 done
}

case "$1" in
 start|"")
 do_start
 ;;
 restart|reload|force-reload)
 echo "Error: argument '$1' not supported" >&2
 exit 3
 ;;
 stop)
 # Do nothing
 ;;
 *)
 echo "Usage: runonce [start|stop]" >&2
 exit 3
 ;;
esac

Then, you’ll need to symlink this script into the directories for the appropriate runlevels, which can be done easily on Debian with the following command:


update-rc.d runonce defaults

Finally, create a directory called /usr/local/etc/runonce.d. Now, you can simply put executable scripts or symlinks to utilities on the system into that directory. They’ll be run the next time you boot up, and then moved into the subdirectory /usr/local/etc/runonce.d/ran for posterity.


Actions

Information

One response

22 11 2017
Daniel Berthiaume

This might be a old port, but I’d like to add the for CentOS, you’ll need to created the symlink with this command :
ln -s /etc/init.d/start_my_app /etc/rc.d/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: